Digital literacy definitions

These are the sources for the Digital literacy, what is it? activity.

Literacy in the information age can be defined as the ability to acquire and utilize knowledge, skills, and other resources to facilitate learning. The development of literacy in the information age is the result of reflecting on past learned literacy for solutions to current and future questions (Devers, 2007).

The term multiliteracies was coined by the New London Group (1996) to highlight two related aspects of the increasing complexity of texts: (a) the proliferation of multimodal ways of making meaning where the written word is increasingly part and parcel of visual, audio, and spatial patterns; (b) the increasing salience of cultural and linguistic diversity characterized by local diversity and global connectedness. See A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies.

The goal of Digital Literacy is to teach and assess basic computer concepts and skills so that people can use computer technology in everyday life to develop new social and economic opportunities for themselves, their families, and their communities.

the term “progressive education” has been used to describe ideas and practices that aim to make schools more effective agencies of a democratic society. …The education of engaged citizens, …involves two essential elements: (1). Respect for diversity, meaning that each individual should be recognized for his or her own abilities, interests, ideas, needs, and cultural identity, and (2). the development of critical, socially engaged intelligence, which enables individuals to understand and participate effectively in the affairs of their community in a collaborative effort to achieve a common good.

Computer literacy is the knowledge and ability to use computers and technology efficiently.

To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information (ALA, 1989)

information literacy [is] a new liberal art that extends from knowing how to use computers and access information to critical reflection on the nature of information itself its technical infrastructure and its social, cultural, and philosophical context and impact.

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